I) Books, Articles about

Terence McKenna Bibliography

This compilation is © 2000–2010 Chris Mays & 2022-2023 Kevin Whitesides.
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Books, Articles about

  • John C. Ryan, Patricia Vieira, and Monica Gagliano, editors (2021) The Mind of Plants: Narratives of Vegetal Intelligence. Synergetic Press, Santa Fe. xxv, 502 pages; Terence McKenna is mentioned only once in this large book, in Chapter 2: Ayahuasca by Luis Eduardo Luna, where Luna mentions his early encounter with McKenna in Colombia in 1971 in the months following the La Chorrera “experiment,” an event which had a substantial impact on both of their future trajectories but which is not detailed at length here (but will be treated in detail in a focused chapter in Altered Statesman: A Terence McKenna Anthology, forthcoming). Worldcat.
  • Jacques Olivier (2021) Nature Loves Courage. Icaro Publishing, Orcas Island. 155 pages; “a hyperspace ride into the love, loss, life, death and rebirth of noted psychonaut Jacques Olivier…and his deep connection to Terence McKenna, culminating in his death on stage at the Imagine Festival on full moon Friday 13, 2019 on Orcas Island, Washington.” McKenna is featured frequently throughout, including a black and white photo of him from behind, hunched over, slowly ascending the steep Pyramid of the Magician at Uxmal.
  • P. D. Newman (2021) Angels in Vermilion: The Philosopher’s Stone from Dee to DMT. Tria Prima Press, Phoenix. xii, lii, 152 pages; Newman dedicates the book “For Terence.” McKenna’s description of DMT as “orange mothballs” is cited, a passage from The Invisible Landscape on shamanic death & rebirth is quoted, and he is quoted again on the alchemical attempt to dissolve the boundary between waking and sleep.
  • Kevin Feeney, editor (2020) Fly Agaric: A Compendium of History, Pharmacology, Mythology, and Exploration. Fly Agaric Press, Ellensburg, Washington. xix, 486 pages; References to McKenna appear in two chapters. “Magical Potions: Entheogenic Themes in Scandinavian Mythology” by Steven Leto discusses McKenna’s views on Soma candidates (that Psilocybe mushrooms seemed more likely than Amanita muscaria) and launches from this into his own analysis. “The Experience” by Kevin Feeney cites Terence (from Food of the Gods, 1992) describing a friend’s fly agaric experience: “…it was not truly psychedelic. It was as if everything were exactly the same but totally unfamiliar…” Worldcat.
  • Chas S. Clifton (2019) Witches Still Fly: Or Do They? Traditional Witches, Wiccans, and Flying Ointment, in Magic and Witchery in the Modern West: Celebrating the Twentieth Anniversary of ‘The Triumph of the Moon’, edited by Shai Feraro and Ethan Doyle White. Springer International Publishing, Cham. xiii, 259 pages; “Parallel to the study of Wicca and Pagan witchcraft by historians of religion lies another sub-discipline in which the psychotropic reality of flying ointment is a given.” Clifton notes that “Dennis McKenna and three friends tried to a re-created ointment…but after two hours, “we realized the unguent had failed to produce the desired effects.” Worldcat.
  • Erik Davis (2019) High Weirdness: Drugs, Esoterica, and Visionary Experience in the Seventies. Strange Attractor Press and The MIT Press, London & Cambridge, Massachussetts. 545 pages; Developed and expanded from his PhD dissertation, the book both documents the historical context of three “weird” sets of happenings (and the writings that came out of them) in the 1970s by way of Terence & Dennis McKenna, Robert Anton Wilson, and Philip K. Dick and delightfully develops the concept and significance of the “weird” as an ontology-defying phenomenological experience, identifying the McKenna’s as practitioners of a “weird naturalism.” Worldcat.
  • James Oroc (2018) The New Psychedelic Revolution: The Genesis of the Visionary Age. Park Street Press, Rochester. 467 pages; McKenna takes up nearly a column of the index with Chapter 3 entirely devoted to “Terence McKenna: The Rise of the Plant Shaman.” “Now, nearly two decades after Terence’s death, and some years after the aftermath of the 2012 hope and hysteria that he helped create, there can be no denying McKenna’s influence on contemporary psychedelic culture.” Worldcat.
  • Tao Lin (2018) Trip: Psychedelics, Alienation, and Change. Vintage Books, New York. 308 pages; “While reeling from one of the most creative–but at times self-destructive–outpourings of his life, Tao Lin discovered the strange and exciting work of Terence McKenna. McKenna, the leading advocate of psychedelic drugs since Timothy Leary, became for Lin both an obsession and a revitalizing force…detailing his experiences with psilocybin, DMT, LSD, salvia, and cannabis, Lin takes readers on a trip through nature, his own past, psychedelic culture, and the unknown.” Worldcat.
  • Ben Sessa (2017) The Psychedelic Renaissance: Reassessing the Role of Psychedelic Drugs in 21st Century Psychiatry and Society, 2nd edition. Muswell Hill Press. xiv, 387 pages; ISBN: 9781908995254. An updated edition of Sessa (2012). Worldcat.

 

 

  • P. D. Newman (2017) Alchemically Stoned: The Psychedelic Secret of Freemasonry. The Laudable Pursuit Press. 191 pages; Newman quotes a lengthy paragraph from Food of the Gods on the nature of the DMT experience and a brief supposition from a 1994 in which McKenna speculates about secret societies holding the secret of DMT. McKenna’s influence on the narrative of DMT experience is also mentioned in a trip report: “The ‘machine elves’ I had always heard McKenna talk about were there, distracting me with their benignly menacing dancing.” Worldcat.
  • Ralph Metzner (2017) Overtones and Undercurrents: Spirituality, Reincarnation, and Ancestor Influence in Entheogenic Psychotherapy. Park Street Press, Rochester. 183 pages; Metzner provides “an account of my introduction to the ayahuasca serpents from an experience I had with my friend Terence McKenna when I was in my late fifties… In my experience, which took place in Northern California, there seemed to be one gigantic serpent mother, coiling and rippling through the entire length and breadth of the valley in which we were situated.” Worldcat.
  • Grant Maxwell (2017) The Dynamics of Transformation: Tracing an Emerging World View. Persistent Press, Nashville. 201 pages; Offers twelve concepts that trace the contours of an emerging world view after the postmodern. McKenna is mentioned in regards to “exponential compaction of temporality…mediated through the exponential growth of technology,” fractals, novelty, virtual reality, and “small mouth noises.” Worldcat.

 

  • Mark J. Estren, editor (2017) One Toke to God: The Entheogenic Spirituality of Cannabis. Cannabis Spiritual Center. 236 pages; A collection of 30 essays on cannabis spirituality. Stephen Gray, in his essay “The Revival of an Ancient Spiritual Ally,” interprets McKenna’s use of “whistling past the graveyard” as an analogy for ego-dissolution and quotes his comment that “nature is not mute, it is man who is deaf.” Worldcat.
  • Jeffery Pritchett and Andrew B. Colvin (2016) And We Hope You Like Shamans, Too: The Secret Life of Mother Nature. New Saucerian Press, Point Pleasant, West Virginia. 156 pages; Terence McKenna is mentioned or quoted in several chapters. Chapter 17 is a reprint of the 1992 High Times interview by David Jay Brown & Rebecca McClen Novick; however, strangely, their names have been stricken from the record.
  • Douglas Osto (2016) Altered States: Buddhism and Psychedelic Spirituality in America. Columbia University Press, New York. xxvi, 300 pages; Osto discusses McKenna’s 1996 interview by Allan Badiner in Tricycle magazine, reveals McKenna’s own role as Badiner’s initiatory ayahuasca “shaman,” and identifies Michele McDonald-Smith as McKenna’s “polar opposite on a spectrum of opinions about Buddhism and psychedelics.” Worldcat.
  • Andrew Monteith (2016) “The Words of McKenna”: Healing, Political Critique, and the Evolution of Psychonaut Religion since the 1960s Counterculture. Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Volume 84, Issue 4, December 2016, Pages 1081–1109. One of the few academic articles focused entirely on McKenna, but unfortunately simply gets most of its information and perspective wrong. Monteith analyzes references to McKenna in Internet forums. https://doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfw010
  • Jesse Jarnow (2016) Heads: A Biography of Psychedelic America. Da Capo Press, Philadelphia. xi, 468 pages; McKenna is featured frequently throughout Jarnow’s engaging and well-researched romp through psychedelic (especially Grateful Dead) cultural history. “In Berkeley in that summer of 1971, a wild-haired, wild-bearded, wild eyed head scribbles wildly in notebooks. He is in possession of certain information that will replicate around the world. If he can only sort it out. His beard shoots outward, and so do his calculations…” Worldcat.
  • David Jay Brown (2016) Dreaming Wide Awake: Lucid Dreaming, Shamanic Healing, and Psychedelics. Park Street Press, Rochester. xi, 404 pages; Mentioned throughout, McKenna’s comments about smoking DMT while in a dream are discussed alongside his comments about the importance of language and culture on our modeling of the world, synesthesia resulting from ayahuasca songs, richer dreamlife in the absence of cannabis, and the efficacious potential of lucid dreaming for cultural transformation. Brown mentions having had lucid dream conversations with McKenna. Worldcat.
  • Graham St John (2015) Mystery School in Hyperspace: A Cultural History of DMT. Evolver Editions, Berkeley. xxiii, 492 pages; As might be expected, the references to McKenna in this well-researched tome cover nearly two columns of the book’s index. Of particular interest is St John’s personal contact with Rick Watson, McKenna’s close friend, who reveals, among other things, newly published details of Terence’s first DMT trip. Worldcat.
  • Tom Shroder (2015) Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal. Plume, New York. xvii, 442 pages; includes a couple of passages mentioning Terence in two separate sections on Rick Doblin, including a story about the origins for funding an MDMA study that developed as a result of a meeting at Esalen as a sort of opposition to Terence’s general cautioning against the promotion of that substance. More details. Worldcat.
  • Michael Sanders (2015) Ayahuasca: An Executive’s Enlightenment. Safe & Feather Press, Toronto. 148 pages; “Sitting near Ricardo, Ceta introduces herself to our group. She is a shaman who works in South and North America. She has been involved with Ayahuasca since the 1990s and has worked with the likes of Terence McKenna, amongst other seekers and psychonauts.”

 

  • James W. Jesso (2015) The True Light of Darkness. SoulsLantern Publishing, Calgary. xxvii, 127 pages; Jesso’s autobiographical account includes his encounter with the ideas of Terence McKenna. “With desperate wings flown on the hot air of the Irish maverick McKenna’s spoken word on jungle healing and fungal intelligence, I reach to the mushroom as though it were my spiritual teacher, a healer, a medicine…Finally, I was inspired again. It turned out, woven into the fantastic fabrics of intergalactic and seriously unrealistic propositions, that McKenna guy really had something valuable to offer.” More details. Worldcat.
  • Ross Heaven (2014) Salvia Divinorum: The Sage of Seers. Moon Books, Winchester. xiii, 102 pages; Worldcat.

 

 

 

 

  • Anthony M. Campos (2014) The Religious Odyssey of Tony Campos: The Story of a Ten-Year Religious Odyssey with the Sacred Mushroom (A God-Manifested Entity) as a Guide. Createspace (Self-published). 312 pages; Tony “has been actively involved in the human potential movement since the 1960s while interacting with Terence McKenna and several other thought leaders…” McKenna is a frequent feature of the book, most notably as a topic of transmissions from the mushroom to Tony.
  • James W. Jesso (2013) Decomposing the Shadow: Lessons from the Psilocybin Mushroom. SoulsLantern Publishing, Calgary. 132 pages; In a chapter titled “Enter McKenna,” Jesso gives a brief bio, describes, “Stoned Ape” theory and outlines some of McKenna’s general topics of discussion. “McKenna opened an entirely new paradigm for the implications of psychedelics and the nature of experience itself.” Worldcat.
  • Michael Barkun (2013) A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America, 2nd edition. University of California Press: Berkeley. xiv, 306 pages; The second edition of Barkun’s classic treatment of conspiracy theory includes a chapter on the 2012 phenomenon; Barkun received feedback from me (Whitesides) as he wrote the chapter but only mentions McKenna in a single sentence (citing Whitesides & Hoopes 2011) indicating him as a conduit of the 2012 idea to Jose Arguelles, who he gives more attention to. Worldcat.
  • James Aston & John Wallis (2013) Small Screen Revelations: Apocalypse in Contemporary Television. Sheffield Phoenix Press, Sheffield. xiv, 208 pages; a chapter by Kevin Whitesides, “From Counterculture to Mainstream: 2012 Millennialism in Your Living Room,” discusses McKenna’s role in the development of the 2012 phenomenon and describes his appearance on the FOX television program Sightings in an episode titled ‘A Vision Through Time’ that profiles his Timewave alongside prophecies by Notradamus and others and the use of McKenna’s eschaton date, 12-22-12, in the series finale of The X-Files. Worldcat.
  • Ben Sessa (2012) The Psychedelic Renaissance: Reassessing the Role of Psychedelic Drugs in 21st Century Psychiatry and Society. Muswell Hill, London. x, 237 pages; Terence McKenna’s name appears on 10 pages in the index (Dennis’ on 4). Identified as “the brilliantly verbose psychedelic commentator,” Sessa indicates McKenna’s extraterrestrial theory of the origin of psilocybin mushrooms; psychedelics as a door to ‘hyperspace’; five dried grams as McKenna’s gold standard for P. cubensis consumption; Stoned Ape; McKenna’s musical collaboration with The Shamen; etc. Worldcat.
  • Andy Roberts (2012) Albion Dreaming: A Popular History of LSD in Britain, Revised edition. Marshall Cavendish, Singapore. xxiv, 324 pages; McKenna is mentioned in passing as among the presenters at Fraser Clark’s Megatripolis festival. “Its festival-like ambience together with a series of guest speakers such as Allen Ginsberg, Terence McKenna, Howard Marks and Baba Ram Dass made it a popular venue for users of LSD and other psychedelics. Rave and dance music mixed with tribal drumming and light shows reminiscent of the Sixties.” Worldcat.
  • Grant Morrison (2012) Supergods. Spiegel & Grau, New York. xvii, 454 pages; Morrison describes “[r]eading Terence McKenna’s True Hallucinations in Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport, tripping at thirty-three thousand feet, aged thirty-three, like Jesus in a post-Cold War international thaw, at large in a charmed era of dancing and hugging and doing what thou wilt in exotic latitudes…” Later, he notes “Unless Terence McKenna’s “Timewave Zero” theories are correct…2021 will bring the cycle back to ‘punk’.” Worldcat.
  • Dennis McKenna (2012) Brotherhood of the Screaming Abyss: My Life with Terence McKenna. North Star Press of St. Cloud, St. Cloud, Minnesota. xx, 508 pages; Terence’s younger brother’s biographical history of his (and their) life together. A central source for McKenna history.

 

 

  • Graham St John & Chiara Baldini (2012) Dancing at the Crossroads of Consciousness: Techno-Mysticism, Visionary Arts and Portugal’s Boom Festival, in Handbook of New Religious Movements and Cultural Production, edited by Carole M. Cusack & Alex Norman. Brill, Leiden. xxix, 789 pages;  McKenna is discussed substantially in this chapter, where he is described as an “anarchist ethnonaturalist and psychedelic mystic,” as well as “chief bard to the neo-psychedelic counterculture,” and “easily the most sampled individual in Goa/psytrance music productions.” “McKenna’s appeal should be recognised within the context of new spiritual trajectories whereby the ‘immediacy of personal experience…is understood as epistemologically crucial’.” “This shamanic sensibility is indebted to the efforts of McKenna;” “The popularity of DMT is one of McKenna’s legacies.” Worldcat.
  • Simon G. Powell (2011) The Psilocybin Solution: The Role of Sacred Mushrooms in the Quest for Meaning. Park Street Press, Rochester. xiv, 272 pages; Powell refers to McKenna on LSD vs. psilocybin, UFOs, the elevated view provided by psychedelics, seekership, the most improbable Big Bang, extraterrestrial life, 2012 and the Omega Point, and the mysterious self-defense mechanisms of psilocybin that prohibit profanation. Worldcat.
  • Patrick Meaney (2011) Our Sentence is Up: Seeing Grant Morrison’s ‘The Invisibles, revised 1st edition. Sequart Research & Literacy Organization, Edwardsville, Illinois. 348 pages; Meaney minutely analyzes Morrison’s partly McKenna-inspired graphic novel series. “Time Speeding Up and 2012:” “One can read the series’s use of 2012 as Morrison riffing on a piece of pop mythology.” “…other-dimensional beings…are the same entities as Terence McKenna’s machine elves, or PKD’s Zebra laser, seen through the lens of ’90s pop culture.” “McKenna’s machine elves get reconceived as little green men.” Includes an interview with Morrison who mentions McKenna. Worldcat.
  • Ken Johnson (2011) Are You Experienced? How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art. Prestel Verlag, Munich & New York. 232 pages; “For Terence McKenna, the avatar of psychedelic salvation and an inspiration to [artist, Steve] DiBenedetto, the octopus was a sacred creature. ‘I believe that the totemic image for the future is the octopus… [they] have perfect a form of communication that is both psychedelic and telepathic… In the not-too-distant future men and women may shed the monkey body to become virtual octopi swimming in a silicon sea.” Worldcat.
  • Richard M. Doyle (2011) Darwin’s Pharmacy: Sex, Plants, and the Evolution of the Noosphere. University of Washington Press, Seattle. ix, 358 pages; McKenna is a central feature throughout. In the Acknowledgments, Doyle remarks “someday there will be a Nobel for Psychonautics, may it be named for the Shulgins and given to the McKennas.” Worldcat.
  • Peter Bebergal (2011) Too Much to Dream: A Psychedelic American Boyhood. Soft Skull Press, Berkeley. xxiii, 232 pages; Bebergal interviewed Dennis McKenna over the phone on November 24, 2009. “Dennis McKenna is often name-checked as merely the brother of the late Terence McKenna… Dennis has made his own mark, however, as one of the most important contemporary researchers in the area of ethnopharmacology…”
  • Gary Danner & Elisa Rose (2010) Station Rose: 20 Digital Years Plus, 1988-2010. Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg, Nürnberg. 191 pages + 1 CD; The experimental digital performance group Station Rose recounts a 1993 event in Frankfurt with McKenna. Preparing for the performance, he wrote: “The further IN you go, the bigger it gets. Technology is the real SKIN of our species. We ARE the sex orgANS of our machines, we exist to improve next years model. We are closing distance… The world is not only stranger… The octopus wears language like clothing. We ARe the tool-MAKing species, we transform matter into culture…” Worldcat.
  • Stephan V. Beyer (2010) Singing to the Plants: A Guide to Mestizo Shamanism in the Upper Amazon. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. xiii, 530 pages; Beyer says, “Terence McKenna speaks of hearing ‘a language of alien meaning that is conveying alien information'” and discusses his “self-transforming machine elves.” Worldcat.

 

  • Mark Christensen (2010) Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD, and the Politics of Ecstasy. Schaffner Press, Tucson. vii, 449 pages; Mark Christensen offers one of the strangest McKenna quotes to date (an idea that just seems patently wrong on its face, on all accounts, no matter how I spin it): “As ‘psychedelic sociologist’ Terence McKenna once said, “Shamanism without psychedelics is like wife-beating without alcohol, it just doesn’t happen.” Worldcat.

 

  • James Oroc (2009) Tryptamine Palace: 5-MeO-DMT and the Sonoran Desert Toad. Park Street Press, Rochester. xvi, 365 pages; “After reading [The Archaic Revival] I was intoxicated with the idea of gods, aliens, and other-dimensional beings, and I was certain that this was the correct way of attempting to communicate with them: surely they would respect my intent.” “This book… became for me both a lifeline and a rocket ship into intellectual hyperspace, as over the next few months, supplemented by regularly smoking 5-MeO-DMT, I gave full and open credence to the wildest rumblings of Terence’s imagination.” Worldcat.
  • Michael Garfield (2009) The Psychedelic Transhumanists. h+ magazine no. 4 “You are the doll.” Editor: R. U. (Ken Goffman) Sirius; pp. 50-56; More information: http://hplusmagazine.com/magazine/2009/fall-2009. Mckenna is quoted extensively in this bouquet of un-cited snippets forming a sort of colloquium on the title theme. Others include Timothy Leary, Marc Pesce, Erik Davis and David Pearce.

  • Rick Strassman, Slawek Wojtowicz, Luis Eduardo Luna, and Ede Frecska (2008) Inner Paths to Outer Space: Journeys to Alien Worlds through Psychedelics and Other Spiritual Technologies. Park Street Press, Rochester. viii, 344 pages; Rick Strassman briefly describes McKenna’s “Stoned Ape” theory; Luis Eduardo Luna tells the story of how he met McKenna in Colombia in 1971, of his visit to Berkeley the following year, and how Terence helped him locate a shaman for a documentary on yage. Science fiction illustrator Slawek Wojtowicz references McKenna on the idea that psilocybin mushrooms produce exopheromones to attract intelligent life and speed up intellectual development. Worldcat.
  • Eliezer Sobel (2008) The 99th Monkey: A Spiritual Journalist’s Misadventures with Gurus, Messiahs, Sex, Psychedelics, and Other Consciousness-Raising Experiments. Santa Monica Press, Santa Monica, California. 310 pages; references McKenna on a preference for psychedelics over gurus and meditation techniques, and in regards to his recommendation for a “heroic dose,” which the author paraphrases as “journeying in the solo warrior tradition of Terence McKenna.” Worldcat.
  • Klea McKenna (2008) The Butterfly Hunter. Edition One Studios, Berkeley CA. 96 pages; Klea McKenna’s art photography monograph samples her inheritance: her father’s large butterfly collection. More information: http://www.kleamckenna.com/#s=0&a=0&at=0&mi=1&pt=0&pi=4&p=-1LibraryThing.

  • Matthew J. Pallamary (2007) Spirit Matters: A Memoir. Mystic Ink Publishing, Carlsbad. 251 pages; ISBN: 9781434318015.

 

 

 

 

  • Douglas Rushkoff (2006) Media Virus: Hidden Agendas in Popular Culture, 2nd edition. Ballantine Books, New York. xv, 344 pages;

 

 

 

 

  • Daniel Pinchbeck (2006) 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl. Jeremy P. Tarcher, New York City. 384 pages; ISBN: 1585424838. Pinchbeck mentions McKenna and his works in passing a score of times in his exploration of an impending transformation of human consciousness.  LibraryThing.

 

  • L. G. Nicholas and Kerry Ogamé (2006) Psilocybin Mushroom Handbook: Easy Indoor and Outdoor Mushroom Cultivation. Quick American Archives, Oakland CA. 224 pages; ISBN: 0932551718. Nicholas and Ogamé, in the prologue and first chapter, outline the historical significance of the mushroom cultivation method the McKenna brothers detail in their “classic” Psilocybin, magic mushroom grower’s guide: A handbook for psilocybin enthusiasts (1976). “With its philosophical asides, lovely, phantasmagorical illustrations, and Lovecraftian speculations about the off-world origins of the organisms and their import for humankind… it is, above all, a great read.”.  LibraryThing.

  • Andy Letcher (2006) Shroom: A cultural history of the magic mushroom. Faber and Faber, London. 360 pages; ISBN: 0571227708. Letcher devotes a chapter to McKenna: “The Elf-Clowns of Hyperspace,” Chapter 14, pp. 250-274 in the Faber and Faber edition. According to Letcher, “… the jury is still out on the question of whether McKenna was an unsung Newton, or was just plain nuts, …”.  LibraryThing.

  • Jan Irvin and Andrew Rutajit (2006) Astrotheology and shamanism: Unveiling the law of duality in Christianity and other religions. Illustrator: Nicholas Zervos. Book Tree, San Diego CA. 236 pages; ISBN: 1585091073, 978-1585091072. McKenna’s stoned ape theory—as well as the entire “The mushroom speaks” from Psilocybin, magic mushroom grower’s guide (1976)—among several other quotes, adorn this kaleidoscopic treatment of drugs, gods and the skies.  LibraryThing.

  • Ross Heaven and Howard G. Charing (2006) Plant Spirit Shamanism: Traditional Techniques for Healing the Soul. Destiny Books, Rochester. xxii, 250 pages; uses McKenna’s term “true hallucination” to counter the notion of psychedelic visions delivering “nonsense images,” touches on “Stoned Ape” theory, and quotes him on the shamanic “search for techniques to access the magical dimensions.” Worldcat.
  • Vanessa Grigoriadis (2006) Daniel Pinchbeck and the new psychedelic elite. Rolling Stone no. 1008 “The 2006 Fall music review.” ISSN: 0035-791X. Illustrator: Matt Mahurin; pp. 88-90,114,116; More information: http://www.vanessagrigoriadis.com/pinchbeck.html. Profile of Pinchbeck, author of Breaking open the head: A psychedelic journey into the heart of contemporary shamanism (2002) and 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl (2006), who is cast as a pretender to the throne once occupied by Leary and then McKenna.

  • Cover Dan Carpenter (2006) A psychonaut’s guide to the invisible landscape : The topography of the psychedelic experience. Park Street Press, Rochester VT. 128 pages; ISBN: 1594770905. Carpenter invokes the title of McKenna’s first book, and heeds his call to document the psychedelic experience, in discussing his DXM (Dextromethorphan) trips. He speculates, building on Jeremy Narby’s The Cosmic Serpent, that McKenna’s self-transforming machine elves of hyperspace are an altered state perception of DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid).  LibraryThing.

  • Chester Brown (2006) The Little Man: Short Strips, 1980 – 1995. Drawn & Quarterly, Montreal & New York. ix, 178 pages; In a comic strip titled “My Mom Was a Schizophrenic” from 1995, Chester Brown includes McKenna in several frames in conversation with Joseph Campbell, Aldous Huxley, Seth Farber, and Stanislav Grof. McKenna says “Because of accidents of botany and history, European history has been away from the psychedelic dimensions for a while;” “We call them ‘schizophrenia’ and close the door;” “Not all shamans use intoxication with plants to obtain ecstasy, but all shamanic practice aims to give rise to ecstasy.” Worldcat.
  • Ian Baker (2006) The Heart of the World: A Journey to Tibet’s Lost Paradise. Penguin Books, New York. xxvi, 511 pages; “Research by the mycologist Terence McKenna…suggests that the principle ingredient of soma–the ritual intoxicant of the Veda–was not Amanita but the more psychoactive and benign psilocybin-containing Stropharia cubensis. McKenna also makes a case for Peganum harmala, Syrian rue, which occurs widely along the ancient caravan and trade routes of Asia…McKenna speculates that the plant may have been used in synergistic combination with …mushrooms and possibly influence the iconography of Tibetan art.” Worldcat.
  • Cover Geoff Stray (2005) Beyond 2012: Catastrophe or ecstasy: A complete guide to end-of-time predictions. Vital Signs Publishing, Lewes UK. 352 pages; ISBN: 095506080X. Stray discusses Dennis and Terence McKenna’s Timewave Zero method of calculating the arrival of the Eschaton based on the King Wen sequence of the I Ching, and relates their theories to many other predictions concerning the winter solstice of 2012.  LibraryThing.

  • Diana Slattery (2005) The noetic connection: synaesthesia, psychedelics, and language. Digital Creativity Vol: 16 no. 2 ISSN: 1462-6268. pp. 122-128; “The literatures that touch on synaesthesias—scientific, art-historical, literary, phenomenological, ethnographic, psychodelic—vary widely in their definitions, their interpretations, and their degree of comfort with the first-person, subjective nature of experiential reports. The significances given to synaesthetic experiences are similarly wideranging. This paper explores the relationships among synaesthesias, psychedelic experience, and language, highlighting Terence McKenna’s synaesthetic language experiences on DMT and magic mushrooms. We describe the complexities of creating and performing with the Synestheater, a system that provides the means to weave together, in multiple mappings, two or more complex visual, aural, and linguistic systems in live performance.”.

  • Tom Robbins (2005) Terence McKenna. In Wild ducks flying backward Bantam Dell, New York City. 112-116 pages; ISBN: 0553804510. Robbins reprints his foreword to The archaic revival: speculations on psychedelic mushrooms, the Amazon, virtual reality, UFOs, evolution, shamanism, the rebirth of the goddess, and the end of history (1991).  LibraryThing.

 

 

  • Eric Paul Cunningham (2004) Visions of a place beyond time: Nishida Kitarō’s historical world and the problem of overcoming modernity. Ph.D. Dissertation in History. Jeffrey Hanes, Advisor. University of Oregon, 480 pages; More information: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=765349911&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=17866&RQT=309&VName=PQD.
  • Cover Daniel Wojcik (2003) Apocalyptic and millennarian aspects of American UFOism. In UFO religions Editor: Christopher Partridge. Routledge, London. 274-300 (of 383) pages; ISBN: 0415263239. Wojcik summarizes McKenna’s view of UFOs as foreshadowing our encounter with the Eschaton, referring to chapters in The archaic revival LibraryThing.

 

  • Peter Stafford (2003) Psychedelics. Ronin Publishing, Berkeley. 144 pages; ISBN: 0914171186.  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

  • Steven Shaviro (2003) Connected, or what it means to live in the Network Society. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis. 289 pages; ISBN: 0816643628.  LibraryThing.

 

 

  • Jim Richardson and Allen Richardson (2003) Trippin’ Balls: DNA TV. Ripsaw News Dec 10, pp. More information: http://www.gonzoscience.com/columns/0018-McKenna.htm.

  • John Horgan (2003) The man in the purple sparkly suit. In Rational Mysticism Houghton Mifflin, New York City. 177-194 (of 292) pages; ISBN: 0618060278.  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

  • Cover Nevill Drury (2003) Magic and Witchcraft: From Shamanism to the Technopagans. Thames & Hudson, New York City. 240 pages; ISBN: 0500511403.  LibraryThing.

 

 

  • Jim DeRogatis (2003) Turn on your mind: Four decades of great psychdelic rock. Hal Leonard Corporation, New York City. ISBN: 0634055488. Briefly discusses McKenna’s involvement with and influence on the rave scene.  LibraryThing.

 

 

  • Eugene Burger and Jeff McBride (2003) Mystery school: an adventure into the deeper meaning of magic. Miracle Factory, Seattle. 448 pages; ISBN: 0971040540. McKenna appears in a section entitled: “Terence Mckenna: Magic, Science, and Language”. More information: http://miraclefactory.net/mystery.htm LibraryThing.

 

 

  • Mark Pesce (2002) Bios and Logos. Pesce explores ideas in The invisible landscape. Posted: Oct 3, 2002. Visited: Jun 4, 2003. More information: http://www.hyperreal.org/~mpesce/biosandlogos.html.

  • Geoff Dyer (2002) The Visionary Cookbook. L.A. Weekly October 25-31, p. 51, 49 Edition. Illustrator: Brian Stauffer. ISSN: 0192-1940. [Review of Breaking open the head] Dyer’s positive review of Pinchbeck’s Breaking open the head takes the book seriously, and both mentions and quotes McKenna. More information: http://www.laweekly.com/ink/02/49/books-dyer.php.

  • Marcus Boon (2002) The imaginal realms: Psychedelics and literature. In The road of excess : A history of writers on drugs Harvard University Press, Cambridge. 218-275 (of 320) pages; ISBN: 0674009142. Boon mentions Food of the gods and True hallucinations on pages 268-70. “…McKenna’s view of the psychedelic imagination is more gnostic than Huxley’s,” since his other worlds “… exist separately from, but are accessible from, this one”.  LibraryThing.

  • Cover Stephen Beard (2002) Aftershocks: the End of Style Culture. Wallflower Press, London. 191 pages; ISBN: 1903364248. Beard publishes here a story that didn’t make it into the London style magazine i-D in 1994 (131, Aug) entitled Confidence Trickster; a review of McKenna’s appearance at Megatripolis that morphs into a positive review of True hallucinations. “Prowling the stage with the mike like a predatory stand-up comedian, he looked every inch the postmodern storyteller as he regaled his audience with tales from the far side of the druggie experience”.  LibraryThing.

  • Zoe7 (2001) Into the Void: Exploring Consciousness, Hyperspace and Beyond Using Brain Technology, Psychedelics, and Altered-Mind States. Zon Worldwide Media. The Archaic Revival (1993) and Food of the Gods (1992) are recommended. Worldcat.

 

 

  • Cover Stuart Walton (2001) Out of it: A cultural history of intoxication. 1st ed. Hamish Hamilton, London. 320 pages; ISBN: 0241140382. Walton, in his quest to establish intoxication as a biological imperative, and reclaim it as a fundamental human right, cites Food of the gods in several contexts.  LibraryThing.

 

  • Andrew O’Hehir (2001) Tripping: An anthology of true-life psychedelic adventures. The Oxford American no. 38 Mar/Apr, ISSN: 1074-4525. [Review of Tripping] Illustrator: Peter Spacek; pp. 135; Positive review of Tripping, the “undisputed highlight” of which is the extended interview with McKenna.

  • Dennis J. McKenna (2001) Terence R.I.P. High Times no. 305 Jan, ISSN: 0310-2165. pp. 8;

 

 

 

 

  • Alix Sharkey (2000) Obituary: Terence McKenna. Independent Apr 15, p. 7, Foreign Edition.

  • Steve Robles (2000) A shaman worth hearing: In memoriam Terence McKenna, 1946-2000. San Francisco Bay Guardian Vol: 34 no. 30 Apr 26, ISSN: 0036-4096. pp. 35; An obituary (with a number of factual errors) by an “experimental DJ” focussing on McKenna’s relationship to acid house music and the rave phenomenon.

  • Jim Richardson and Allen Richardson (2000) Gonzo Science: In Memoriam; Terrence [sic] McKenna. Ripsaw News Vol: 2 no. 20 Aug 2, pp. 19; More information: http://www.gonzoscience.com/columns/0018-McKenna.htm.

  • Nestor Perala (2000) McKenna didn’t predict the end of the world, exactly. Mushroom: The journal of wild mushrooming Vol: 18 no. 4 Fall #69, ISSN: 0740-8161. pp. 39; Letter to the editor. Perala corrects the impression in Martin’s New York Times obituary (Terence McKenna, 53, Dies, 2000) that McKenna ever stated “the end of the world” would occur on December 22, 2012: “At a weekend workshop which he conducted, I asked him what the world would be like the day after Dec. 22. He said, ‘I have no idea. I can only tell you what my calculations show’”.

  • Pablo P. Pavillard (2000) McKenna y la broma cósmica [McKenna and the cosmic joke]. In Visionarios. Ebriedad, sustancias y plantas de poder: Reflexión y creatividad [Visionaries. Intoxication, essences and plants of power: Reflection and creativity] Editor: José Carlos Aguirre. (In Spanish) El Idiota, Madrid. 320 pages;  LibraryThing.

 

  • Don Mills (2000) ‘90s version of Timothy Leary believed drugs were salvation. National Post Vol: 2 no. 143 Apr 10, ISSN: 1486-8008. pp. A16;

  • Dennis J. McKenna (2000) Terence McKenna Update: December ‘99. After Dark: the official Art Bell newsletter February, pp. 14;

  • Douglas Martin (2000) Terence McKenna, “the Timothy Leary of the ‘90s,” dies. Mushroom: The journal of wild mushrooming Vol: 18 no. 3 Summer #68, ISSN: 0740-8161. pp. 30; Excerpt of Martin’s New York Times obituary Terence McKenna, 53, Dies.

  • Douglas Martin (2000) Terence McKenna, 53, Dies; Patron of Psychedelic Drugs. New York Times Apr 9, p. 40, Sunday, Final Edition. ISSN: 0362-4331.

  • Mark Luce (2000) Good Trips, Bad Trips — the Use and Abuse of Illegal Drugs. San Francisco Chronicle Dec 3, p. 5,11, [Review of Tripping] Luce reviews Plant’s Writing on drugs and Hayes’ Tripping. While he is irritated by the number accounts in the book and the length of the McKenna interview, Luce finds the book intriguing and McKenna insightful. More information: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/12/03/RV88864.DTL.

  • Cover Lawrence Hagerty (2000) The spirit of the Internet: Speculations on the evolution of global consciousness. Matrix Masters, San Diego. 240 pages; ISBN: 097036511X. Hagerty dedicates the book to McKenna, and quotes McKenna from several sources, including In praise of psychedelics (1988), Spacetime Tsunami (1992), Psychedelic society (1997).  LibraryThing.

  • Nevill Drury (2000) History of magic in the modern age: A quest for personal transformation. Carrol & Graf, New York City. 304 pages; ISBN: 0786707828. McKenna is discussed in Chapter Ten: Archetypes and Cyberspace LibraryThing.

 

 

 

  • Frazer Clark (2000) Obituary for a prophet unrecognised in his own time. Visited: Apr 10, 2000.

  • Richard T. Carey (2000) Illuminated Manuscript: Robert Venosa’s Illuminatus. MAPS: Newsletter of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Vol: 10 no. 3 Fall, “Psychedelics and Creativity.” Editor: Sylvia Thyssen and Jon Hanna; Illustrator: Robert Venosa; pp. 28-29;

 

  • Anon (2000) Spiritual theorist also promoted mushrooms. Daily Breeze Apr 6, p. A4, Brief obituary.

  • Anon (2000) Obituaries; Terence McKenna; Promoter of Psychedelic Drug Use. Los Angeles Times Apr 7, p. B6, Illustrator: Photo credit: San Francisco Chronicle © 1994. ISSN: 0458-3035. This obituary quotes Greatful Dead leader Jerry Garcia: “[He’s] the only person who’s made a serious effort to objectify the psychedelic experience—and done a good job of it.“.

  • Anon (2000) In Memorium: Terence McKenna. Green Egg: a journal of the awakening Earth Vol: 32 no. 134 May-Jun, “Play & Imagination.” ISSN: 1066-7385. pp. 48;

 

 

  • Anon (2000) Terence McKenna takes his ultimate trip. Shaman’s Drum: a journal of experiential Shamanism no. 56 Summer, ISSN: 0887-8897. pp. 9;

  • Anon (2000) In Memoriam: Terence McKenna. MAPS: Newsletter of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Vol: 10 no. 2 Summer, “Endings and Beginnings.” pp. 20; More information: http://www.maps.org/news-letters/v10n2/terence.html.

  • Anon (2000) Terence McKenna. San Francisco Chronicle Apr 6, p. C2, Final Edition.

  • Anon (2000) Terrence [sic] McKenna: Final message from beyond. Ecstasy: Journal of Divine Experience no. 3 “The Sex Issue!” pp. Announcement of TMs death, followed by TMs Novelty List address of [date].

  • Anon (2000) Terence McKenna, psychedelic pioneer, dies aged 53. Reuters English News Service Apr 7, p. A9, Night Final Edition.

  • Anon (2000) New-age theorist and magic mushroom advocate Terence McKenna dies. Associated Press State & Local Wire Apr 5, p.

  • David Aardvark (2000) Reflecting…. Entheogen Review Vol: 9 no. 3 Winter, ISSN: 1066-1913. pp. 121; Review of Dec. 15, 2000 Countdown to 2012 benefit for McKenna at 7th Note Showclub in San Francisco.

  • David Aardvark (2000) Saying Good-bye… (a farewell to Terence McKenna). Entheogen Review Vol: 9 no. 1 Spring/Summer, ISSN: 1066-1913. pp. 1;

  • Ralph Metzner (1999) Green Psychology: Transforming Our Relationship to the Earth. Park Street Press, Rochester. x, 229 pages; “As Robert Graves, Terence McKenna, and others have suggested, it is likely that the “wine” consumed in the Dionysian and Bacchic rites included not only fermented grapes but also various hallucinogenic and aphrodisiac herbs–perhaps psilocybin mushrooms related to the famous “magic mushrooms” of the ancient Mexican shamanic tradition.” Worldcat.

 

  • Dennis William Hauck (1999) The Emerald Tablet: Alchemy for Personal Transformation. Penguin Books, New York City. 452 pages; ISBN: 0140195718. Hauck quotes briefly from The archaic revival (1991) and the Omni interview (Interview: Terence McKenna, 1993) in his recasting of Hermetic teachings for modern alchemical seekers.  LibraryThing.

 

  • Jon Hanna (1999) Terence. Entheogen Review Vol: 8 no. 2 Summer, ISSN: 1066-1913. pp. 45;

 

 

 

  • Jon Hanna (1999) Timothy Leary: outside looking in. Entheogen Review Vol: 8 no. 3 ISSN: 1066-1913. [Review of Timothy Leary: outside looking in] pp. 120-121; Hanna gives a positive review of this Leary festschrift, but without mentioning McKenna’s contribution.

 

  • Cover Michael Fairchild (1999) Rock Prophecy: Sex & Jimi Hendrix in World Religions; The Original Asteroid Prediction & Microsoft Connection; Defining the Faith of Creation’s Way: Religion of the Freeks. First Century Press, Rochester NY. 380 pages; ISBN: 1929342020. Fairchild quotes extensively from Food of the gods in his exegetical resuscitation of Jimi Hendrix’s “prophecy… concerning an asteroidal extinction event.” In Fairchild’s view, Hendrix is the “figurehead” of McKenna’s archaic revival (p. 189).  LibraryThing.

  • Fred Botting (1999) Virtual Romanticism. In Romanticism and postmodernism Editor: Edward Larrissy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge UK. 98-112 (of 238) pages; ISBN: 0521642728.  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

  • Art Bell and Brad Steiger (1999) The source: Journey through the unexplained. Paper Chase, New Orleans LA. 224-225,232 pages; The paranormal prophet of Pahrump quotes McKenna in two brief sections of his examination of “unexplained” phenomena: Time and Human Imagination & We Are Being Shaped by Something LibraryThing.

 

  • Simon Reynolds (1998) Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture. Little, Brown and Company, Boston. 454 pages; ISBN: 0316741116. McKenna’s stoned ape theory and the Eschaton, as well as his influence on rave culture, receive a scattered handful of mentions. There is also a 1999 paperback edtion by Routledge, New York, 0415923735.  LibraryThing.

 

  • Jonathan Ott (1998) Post-Wasson history of the Soma Plant. Eleusis: Journal of Psychoactive Plants & Compounds Vol: New Series no. 1 ISSN: 1129-7301. pp. 29-37; Ott criticizes Food of the gods for sloppy scholarship.

  • Michael Mirolla (1998) Mind-melding on the Net. Gazette Feb 8, p. D4, Final Edition. ISSN: 0384-1294.

  • Gyrus (1998) The End of the River. Towards 2012 no. 4/5 “apocalypse.” ISSN: 1359-2815. pp. [121]-[126],[128]; More information: http://dreamflesh.com/essays/endofriver/.

 

 

 

  • John N. Grunwell (1998) Ayahuasca Tourism in South America. MAPS: Newsletter of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Vol: 8 no. 3 Fall, “The Ayahuasca Issue.” pp. 59-62; More information: http://www.maps.org/news-letters/v08n3/08359gru.html.

 

  • Kevin Tyler Dann (1998) Bright colors falsely seen: Synaesthesia and the modern search for transcendental knowledge. Yale University Press, New Haven CT. 240 pages; ISBN: 0300066198.  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

  • Antonio Bianchi and Piero Coppo (1998) La cultura psichedelica e il mito della revoluzione planetaria [Psychedelic culture and the myth of planetary revolution]. In Piante, sciamani e droghe: uso e abuso dell’estasi chimica [Plants, shamans and drugs: Use and abuse of chemical ecstasy] (In Italian) Edizione Colibrì, Milano. 53-75 (144 total) pages; ISBN: 8886345186. McKenna’s work is discussed in the section “McKenna e l’iperspazio: una mitologia mancata,” 69-72 [McKenna and hyperspace: a failed mythology].  LibraryThing.

  • Harley Barnhart (1998) Sacred mushrooms and the law. Mushroom: The journal of wild mushrooming Vol: 16 no. 4 Fall #61, ISSN: 0740-8161. [Review of Sacred mushrooms & the law] pp. 34-35; Favorable review of Boire’s book Sacred mushrooms & the law, although McKenna’s foreword is labelled “rancorous and contumacious”.

  • Anon (1998) unknown. Esquire Japan Vol: ? Mar, pp.?;

 

 

 

  • Anon (1998) Het Leeslint: Drugs. Dagblad de Limburger Oct 2, p. (In Dutch)

  • Anon (1998) Trialogues at the Edge of the Millennium: A day with Ralph Abraham, Terence McKenna and Rupert Sheldrake. Business Wire May 21, p. 1,

  • Spirit no. 6 Jun/Jul, Illustrator: Josef Cabey; pp. 14-15; A brief survey of psychedelic issues and substances. McKenna is mentioned several times.

  • Michael Pinchera (1997) Dennis McKenna Interview. TRP: The Resonance Project no. 2 Winter, pp. Dennis McKenna briefly mentions how Terence turned his little brother on to marijuana, along with his feelings about the Eschaton.

 

  • Sukie Miller (1997) After Death : A Geography of the Journey Beyond Death. Simon & Schuster, New York City. 240 pages; ISBN: 0684822369. Brief discussion of McKenna’s description of DMT hyperspace (N,N-dimethyltryptamine) as an “afterdeath vision,” along with such visions of Swedenborg and Rudolph Steiner. (pp. 131-2 of the 1st edition).  LibraryThing.

 

  • Bruce Eisner (1997) Dedication to Terence McKenna. Psychedelic Island Views Vol: 3 no. 1 “Terence McKenna’s vision of a future culture.” Illustrator: photo: Kathleen Carr; pp. 1;

 

 

  • Paul Devereux (1997) The long trip: a prehistory of psychedelia. Penguin Arkana, New York City. xxii,298 pages; ISBN: 0140195408.  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

 

  • Cover Matthew Collin and John Godfrey (1997) Altered State: The Story of Ecstasy Culture and Acid House. Serpent’s Tail, London. 288 pages; ISBN: 1852423773. Brief discussion of McKenna, and his relation to house music in the 1990s (pp. 205-6 of the first edition).  LibraryThing.

 

 

  • Kate Chapman (1997) 1997 Botanical Preservation Corps Seminar on Ethnobotany and Chemistry of Psychoactive Plants. MAPS: Newsletter of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Vol: 7 no. 2 Spring, “Synchronicity.” pp. 13-17; More information: http://www.maps.org/news-letters/v07n2/07213cha.html.

  • Anon (1997) LX94 Manual of Evasion. Head Magazine no. 8 ISSN: 1359-2815. [Review of Manual of evazion] pp. 15; Regretful negative review of Pêra’s Manual of evazion: “It kind of degenerates into the McKenna roadshow…”.

  • Anon (1997) Renowned Ethnobotanist Terence McKenna to Chat on Talk City, The Chat Network. PR Newswire Oct 6, p.

  • Gary Wolf (1996) And No Techno!. Favorable review of Surfing on Finnegan’s wake. Visited: Feb 6, 2001. More information: http://web.archive.org/web/20000525184649/http://hotwired.lycos.com/books/96/01/mckenna.html.

  • Ian Winn (1996) Notes on a Weekend with Terence McKenna. Tweak pp. More information: http://www.tweak.com/muck/dement/.

  • Andrew Weil (1996) Pharmacology of consciousness: a narrative of subjective experience. In Toward a Science of Consciousness: the first Tucson discussions and debates Editor: Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak and Alwyn C. Scott. MIT Press, Cambridge MA. 677-689 (of 790) pages; ISBN: 0262082497. Weil dismisses McKenna’s psilocybin/magic mushroom (psilocybin) origin of consciousness theory [p. 687], saying that accidental ingestion of psychedelics by primates could reduce, rather than increase, their chance of procreating.  LibraryThing.

  • Michael Simmons (1996) I killed Tim Leary. L.A. Weekly Oct 3, p. 100-101, ISSN: 0192-1940. Cartoon version of the story of a synchronistic encounter with Leary, involving McKenna, The archaic revival and Leary’s High Priest.

  • Michael Simmons (1996) We’d love to turn you off: The VA’s bad trip over psychedelic futurist. L.A. Weekly May 31-Jun 6, p. 16-17,20, Illustrator: photo: Kathleen Carr. ISSN: 0192-1940. Simmons reports on the unsuccessful attempt by UCLA, at the behest of the Department of Veterans Affairs, to block McKenna from speaking at a VA auditorium. More information: http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.leary.com/news/Politics/Terrence.html.

  • Dennis Romero (1996) Talking with the Timothy Leary of the ‘90s. Los Angeles Times May 3, p. 1-3, Illustrator: photo: Jay Blakesberg. ISSN: 0458-3035.

  • Stephen Rees (1996) Metamorphosis: A trialogue on chaos and the world soul. Video Librarian Vol: 11 no. 1 ISSN: 0887-6851. [Review of Metamorphosis] pp. 16; A review of Metamorphosis (1995) recommending it only for “think tanks and university libraries”.

  • Judith Palmer (1996) EVENT The Incident ICA, London. Independent Oct 18, p. 19,

  • William S. Moxley (1996) The Center of the Universe: A Theory of Psychedelic Experience. Several paragraph discussion of McKenna’s psilocybin/magic mushroom (psilocybin) origin of consciousness theory, among others, in Chapter Seven: Evolution. Moxley mentions Andrew Weil’s rejection of McKenna’s theory that appeared in Toward a Science of Consciousness. Visited: Dec 1, 2000. More information: http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/lsd/univcont.htm.

  • Richard Kadrey (1996) Chaos and the World Soul. Wired Vol: 4 no. 1 ISSN: 1059-1028. [Review of Metamorphosis] pp. More information: http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/4.01/streetcred.html?pg=4.

 

  • Harley Jebens (1996) Digital dreams; It’s a dream, it’s a game, it’s a film, it’s… ‘Strange Attractor’ a psychedelic Web experience unlike any other. Austin American-Statesman May 9, p. 22, ISSN: 0199-8560.

  • Desson Howe (1996) Film Capsules. Washington Post Mar 22, p. N41, Final Edition. ISSN: 0190-8286.

  • Gyrus (1996) Dionysus Risen. Towards 2012 no. 2 ISSN: 1359-2815. pp. 42-56; More information: http://dreamflesh.com/essays/dionysusrisen/.

 

 

 

  • Josh Grossberg (1996) Reputation precedes ‘Leary protege’’: VA tries to move speech off site. The Outlook May 11, p. B1, ISSN: 0898-5375.

  • Elyssa Getreu (1996) Free Speech. City News Service May 10, p.

  • Richard Gehr (1996) The state of the stone: A psychedelic reformation is underway: A report from the edge. Village Voice Vol: 41 no. 45 Nov 5, ISSN: 0042-6180. pp. 33-36;

  • Mark Dery (1996) Escape velocity: cyberculture at the end of the century. Grove Press, New York NY. viii, 376 pages; ISBN: 0802115802.  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

  • Horace Beach (1996) Listening for the Logos: a study of reports of audible voices at high doses of psilocybin. MAPS: Newsletter of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Vol: 7 no. 1 Winter, “Learning to Crawl.” pp. 12-17; More information: http://www.maps.org/news-letters/v07n1/07112bea.html.
  • Anon (1996) Timothy Leary’s dead. Independent Oct 6, p. 4,

  • Runyan Wilde (1995) Hallucinations on the archaic revival. Psychedelic Illuminations no. 8 Winter 1995-6, pp. 66-69;

  • Barry Walters (1995) McKenna: Exit, stage left; All talk, no action at Solo Mio. San Francisco Examiner Oct 2, p. C1,

  • Scott Veale (1995) Nowhere Land. New York Times Dec 31, p. 11, Late Edition. ISSN: 0362-4331. [Review of The Flight into Egypt: Binding the Book (1995)] Mixed review of Ely’s pictorial work based on his grandfather’s travel journal. Veale declares McKenna’s Foreword “entertaining” and “stuffed with New Age blarney”.

  • Barbara J. Vaughan (1995) Global Perspectives and Psychedelic Poets [sic] by Terence McKenna. Library Journal Vol: 120 no. 2 Feb 1, ISSN: 0363-0277. [Review of Global perspectives and psychedelic poetics] pp. 115; Generally positive review of Global perspectives and psychedelic poetics. “[H]is arguments are provocative, incisive, and not without a scholarly base. He should be heard by experts in fields involved in studying psychoactive drugs”.

  • Peter Stack (1995) Everybody Must Get Hemp, Film Suggests. San Francisco Chronicle Nov 29, p. C1, Final Edition.

  • Jon Spayde (1995) 100 visionaries who could change your life. Utne Reader Jan, ISSN: 8750-0256. pp. 54-82; McKenna is briefly profiled as #67 on page 70, and describes his current interests (the rave scene, virtual reality and virtual community) on page 80.

  • Ard Qualm (1995) Voedsel der Goden (excerpts). EGO 2000 no. 6 (In Dutch) pp. 95-97;

  • Russ Kick (1995) Alien dreamtime. In Outposts: A catalog of rare and disturbing alternative information Carrol & Graf, New York. 62-63 (of 264) pages; ISBN: 0786702028.  LibraryThing.

  • Russ Kick (1995) The invisible landscape. In Outposts: A catalog of rare and disturbing alternative information Carrol & Graf, New York. 62 (of 264) pages; ISBN: 0786702028.  LibraryThing.

  • Russ Kick (1995) Food of the gods. In Outposts: A catalog of rare and disturbing alternative information Carrol & Graf, New York. 62 (of 264) pages; ISBN: 0786702028.  LibraryThing.

  • John Hartl (1995) Anti-reefer madness: the case for hemp. Seattle Times Nov 17, p. F6, Final Edition. ISSN: 0745-9696.

  • Carol Dratch-Kovler (1995) Alien Dreamtime. Library Journal Vol: 120 no. 6 Apr 1, ISSN: 0363-0277. [Review of Alien Dreamtime] pp. 139;

  • Kevin Tyler Dann (1995) Bright colors falsely seen: Synaesthesia and the modern search for transcendental knowledge. Ph.D. Dissertation in History. T. J. Jackson Lears, Advisor. Rutgers University, New Brunswick. 375 pages; More information: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=742794371&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=17866&RQT=309&VName=PQD.

  • Kirsten Bonde (1995) Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge. Anthropology of Consciousness Vol: 6 no. 1 Mar, ISSN: 1053-4202. [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 35-36;

  • Anon (1995) Surfing on Finnegans Wake and Riding Range with Marshall McCluhan. Publishers Weekly Vol: 242 no. 36 Sep 4, ISSN: 0000-0019. [Review of Surfing on Finnegan’s wake] pp. 32-33;

  • Robert Anton Wilson (1994) Chaos and beyond: The best of Trajectories. The Permanent Press, San Jose CA. ISBN: 1886404003. Wilson collects essays from his Trajectories magazine, including his review of Food of the gods: Book Previews (1991).  LibraryThing.

  • Valdamar Valerian (1994) Matrix IV: The Equivideum: Paradigms and Dimensions of Human Evolution and Consciousness. Leading Edge International Research Group, Yelm WA. 1134 pages;  LibraryThing.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Howard L. Rheingold (1994) True hallucinations. Whole Earth Review no. 82 Spring, ISSN: 0749-5056. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 107; Positive review of True hallucinations, followed by an excerpt where Dennis McKenna telephones his mother in 1953 from the jungle in 1971.

  • Steve Rabey (1994) Instant karma/ Psychedelic drug use on the rise as a quick route to spirituality. Colorado Springs Gazette – Telegraph Aug 13, p. E1, McKenna is briefly profiled among others in this article on drug use for spiritual growth.

  • Michael Raymond Pryzdia (1994) The wake of imagination and the postmodern meaning of “meaning” (Derrida, Jacques, Campbell, Joseph, Thompson, William Irwin, Mckenna, Terence). Ph.D. Dissertation in Philosophy. Ellen Berry, Advisor. Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green. 228 pages; More information: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=741286621&sid=1&Fmt=2&clientId=17866&RQT=309&VName=PQD.

  • Randy Pitman (1994) Alien Dreamtime. Video Librarian Vol: 9 no. 3 May-Jun, ISSN: 0887-6851. [Review of Alien Dreamtime] pp. 26; Generally positive review of Alien Dreamtime: “Older acid freaks will probably love this, …”.

  • Tom McIntyre (1994) Millenium Witness; Psychedelic anthropologist Terence McKenna takes on the brave new world. San Francisco Examiner Oct 9, p. 12-13,19-24, Illustrator: photo: Ken Miller.

  • Jules Marshall (1994) Zippies! Wired Vol: 2 no. 5 May, ISSN: 1059-1028. pp. 79+; Identifies McKenna as a “psychedelic hero” to “zippies,” British Zen-inspired professional pagans, or ““hippies with zip””.

  • Howard Manly (1994) Listening to the voices from ‘Cyberia’. The Sun Jul 21, p. 10D, McKenna is quoted as one of the voices from Douglas Rushkoff’s Cyberia: Life in the trenches of hyperspace (1994). Rushkoff comments: “[H]ave psychedelics and virtual reality really come to us as a philosopher’s stone, or is it simply that our philosophers are stoned?”.

  • Samuel Lawson (1994) Life’s middle name: Intiatory fear and spontaneous ego-death misperceived as biological death. Towards 2012 no. 1 “Part 1: Death/Rebirth.” ISSN: 1359-2815. pp. 14-25; More information: http://dreamflesh.com/essays/lifesmiddlename/. Lawson includes a passing reference to True hallucinations, and quotes the passage where Dennis climbs the “world tree” and gazes into “the vortex” before fainting.

  • James Kent (1994) Renegade in Babylon: Terence McKenna and the Descent into Chaos. Whole Life Times ISSN: 0279-5604. pp. More information: http://users.lycaeum.org/~lux/features/renegade.htm.

  • Richard Kadrey (1994) Alien Dreamtime. Whole Earth Review no. 82 Spring, ISSN: 0749-5056. [Review of Alien Dreamtime (Video, 1993)] pp. 106; A positive review: “A sure delight for Deadheads, psychedelic shock troops, UFO mutants, technoids and New Agers of all persuasions.”.

  • Cliff Jones (1994) Insane in the membrane. The Face Vol: 2 no. 67 Apr, ISSN: 0263-1210. pp. 98-102;

  • John Major Jenkins (1994) Tzolkin: Visionary Perspectives and Calendar Studies. Borderland Sciences Research Foundation, Garberville, California. 329 pages; “What Alfred North Whitehead called concrescence and what visionary philosopher Terence McKenna calls ingression of novelty is the dawning of Planet Mind – the freeing of the human spirit from limitation and oppression.”

 

  • Tom Hodgkinson (1994) Fungus freaks. New Statesman & Society Vol: 7 no. 309 Jul 1, ISSN: 0954-2361. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 37-38; Snickering review of True hallucinations. “For any grown-up dreamer whose youth was clouded with tales of mystery and adventure but is now intrigued by the revelatory promises of drug-taking—and there are a lot of them around—the book is a dream come true”.

  • Mary Jo Griffith (1994) Main Event: Counterculture figure speaks at Chapman. Orange County Register Mar 31, p. F2, Brief announcement of the Chapman University conference “Psychedelics, Rave Culture and the Students of the ’90s: Creativity, Insight and Illumination.”, where McKenna appeared with Timothy Leary and Ram Dass.

  • Eric Gladstone (1994) Terence McKenna’s rave new world. AP (Alternative Press) Vol: 8 no. 68 Mar, ISSN: 1065-1667. pp. 90; Review of Alien Dreamtime.

  • Brendan Glacken (1994) Tripping out with Terence, the psychonaut of inner space. Irish Times May 23, p. 12, City Edition. ISSN: 0791-5144.

  • Jim DeRogatis (1994) Compilations of music to rave by. Chicago Sun-Times May 8, p. 5, Late Sports Final Edition. ISSN: 0195-6442.

  • Susan De Muth (1994) In bed with Susan de Muth: Life is a waking psychedelic dream; Terence McKenna. Independent May 18, p. 21,

  • Erik Davis (1994) Zippy the tech-head: British cyber-hippies invade New York. Village Voice Jul 5, ISSN: 0042-6180. pp. 29;

  • Catherine Applefeld (1994) Video Previews: Performance. Billboard Vol: 106 no. 4 Jan 22, ISSN: 0006-2510. [Review of Alien Dreamtime] pp. 70; A negative review of Alien Dreamtime that refers to McKenna (unnamed) as a “sniveling little man who throws out empty sound bites” whose “delivery is enough to scare Timothy Leary straight”.

  • Sharon Warren (1993) Letter to the editor. Mondo 2000 no. 11 pp. 12; Letter responding to interview in Mondo 2000 10 (Terence and the coming Eschaton, 1993). Warren complains about McKenna’s dismissive comments about crop circles and their enthusiasts.

  • David Toop (1993) Sounds like a radical vision. Times Feb 18, p. [none cited], ISSN: 0307-661X. Discussion of the Shamen charted single: Re: Evolution (1993), that incorporates a canonical McKenna monologue. McKenna explains why he collaborated: “It was very important to me to reach this 17-28 market. It wasn’t my market in the States.”.

  • Scott Thomas (1993) In the Amazon, tour guides for a journey of the mind. Buffalo News May 2, p. 7, Sunday, Final Edition. ISSN: 0006-2510. The reviewer may be somewhat agape, but the review of True hallucinations (1993) is open-minded, and takes the story at face value.

  • Genevieve Stuttaford (1993) True hallucinations. Publishers Weekly Vol: 240 no. 15 Apr 12, ISSN: 0000-0019. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 52; A mixed review by a bewildered reviewer. “McKenna flashes forward to Hawaii in 1975 where mantis-like creatures from hyperspace attack his lover, and flashes back to his tantric lovemaking in Tibet and to Indonesia where unrepentant Nazi scientists tried to recruit him in 1970”.

  • Rick Strassman (1993) Food of the Gods. Network: The Scientific and Medical Network Newsletter no. 53 Dec, [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 58-59; A sympathetic review of Food of the gods by a leading DMT (N,N-dimethyltryptamine) researcher. Strassman is critical of McKenna’s drug biases and unscientific exposition—“a romantic collection of essays”—but more to warn uninitiated scientist readers than to discourage readers generally.

  • Fred Smith (1993) Mavericks of the Mind. Psychedelic Illuminations no. 5 [Review of Mavericks of the mind] pp. 69-70;

 

 

 

  • Richard Evans Schultes (1993) Food of the Gods by Terence McKenna. American Scientist Vol: 81 no. 5 Sep/Oct, ISSN: 0003-0996. [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 489; More information: http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/mckenna/mckenna_review2.shtml.

  • Alix Sharkey (1993) Saturday Night: From Mike’s flat to a parallel universe. Independent Nov 27, p. 37,

  • Alix Sharkey (1993) A psychedelic trip up the ladder of evolution. Independent Jul 10, p. 37, More information: http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/mckenna_terence/mckenna_review1.shtml.

  • Will Self (1993) Food of the gods. Times Jan 22, p. 7, ISSN: 0307-661X. [Review of Food of the gods]

  • Donna Seaman (1993) True hallucinations. Booklist Vol: 89 Mar 15, ISSN: 0006-7385. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 1277;

  • Sylvia Rubin (1993) Mr. Mushroom Raves On; Psychedelic guru McKenna trips out a new generation. San Francisco Chronicle Aug 16, p. E3, Illustrator: photo: Lea Suzuki.

  • Frank Owen (1993) Log on, lock in, space out: A beginner’s guide to new edge culture. Newsday Apr 18, p. 7-[9], Nassau Edition. McKenna is listed, with a cursory paragraph, among others—William Gibson, Timothy Leary, …—in this whirlwind survey of things cyber-, psychedelic, and post-human.

  • Maffew Objekt (1993) Shamanism and The End of the World As We Know It. Zippy Times no. Two pp. [30-[31]; A favorable review, and a synopsis, of a talk by McKenna of the same name given at the restaurant Fungus Mungus in London on February 10, 1993. “A lord arrived directly from the House of Lords, a German baron, three ‘retired’ dope dealers, five ‘acid house’ djs, several ‘heroes’ of the sixties and a number of comfortably-off New Age therapists for whom £30 was no problem at all but who had obviously come to the conclusion that perhaps, after all, aromatherapy didn’t quite hit the button. As Fraser [Clark] summed it up: ‘A true networking of the extremes of the underground going overground’”.

  • Timothy O’Neill (1993) Trialogues at the edge of the West. Small Press no. 11 Spring, ISSN: 0000-0485. [Review of Trialogues at the edge of the west] pp. 70;

  • Alfonso Montouri (1993) Food of the Gods. World Futures Vol: 37 no. 4 Aug, ISSN: 0260-4027. [Review of Food of the gods and The archaic revival] pp. 211-212; A sympathetic review of Food of the gods and The archaic revival: “[T]he point is not even so much if he is right or wrong, but the kind of bizarre and fascinating connections he makes which open up worlds of creativity and imagination for the reader”.

  • Peter Meyer (1993) Time Wave Zero. Dolphin Software, More information: http://serendipity.magnet.ch/twz/index.html LibraryThing.

  • Paul Lashmar (1993) Come fly with me: the hysteria surrounding the whole issue of drugs prevents an examination of the real value and historical significance of psychedelics. New Statesman & Society no. 6 Jun 25, ISSN: 0954-2361. pp. 18-20;

  • Eric Hinsdale (1993) Anthropology & customs — True hallucinations by Terence McKenna. Library Journal Vol: 118 no. 6 Apr 1, ISSN: 0363-0277. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 109; Generally negative review of True hallucinations. “Pseudoscientific ramblings concerning the nature of time serve only to move this book farther out toward the fringes”.

  • Roy Herbert (1993) Trialogues at the edge of the West. New Scientist Vol: 137 no. 1857 Jan 23, ISSN: 0262-4079. [Review of Trialogues at the edge of the west] pp. 45;

  • Jordan Gruber (1993) Stalking the elusive Oo-Koo-Hé. Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 28 Summer, “One God or Many?” ISSN: 0894-6159. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 80-81;

  • Scardocchia Gaetano (1993) Un fungo per il paradiso; America, Terence McKenna e’ il nuovo profeta degli allucinogeni: vi faro’ entrare “nel cuore del mistero”. La Stampa May 9, p. 19, ISSN: 1122-1763.

  • Trip Gabriel (1993) Tripping, but not falling. New York Times May 2, p. 6, Late Final Edition. ISSN: 0362-4331.

  • Jory Farr (1993) Western world’s wake-up call. Press-Enterprise Feb 14, p. F01, ISSN: 0746-4258.

  • George Earley (1993) Letter to the Editor. UFO: A forum on extraordinary theories and phenomena Vol: 8 no. 5 ISSN: 1043-1233. pp. 5; Earley maligns McKenna’s credibility generally on the basis of his having said in an interview (Questioning Terence McKenna, 1993) that Jung’s book on flying saucers (Ein Moderner Mythus von Dingen, die am Himmel gesehen werden, 1958) appeared within 18 months of a first widely reported siting, rather than 11 years later, and suggests one ignore “the muddled musings of a drug-sodden brain”.

  • Dennis Drabelle (1993) Far out and in deep. Book world Vol: 23 no. 24 Jun 13, ISSN: 0006-7369. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 9;

  • Katherine Diehl (1993) History Ends In Green. Body Mind Spirit Magazine Vol: 12 no. 6 ISSN: 0895-7657. [Review of History ends in green] pp. 57-58;

  • Katherine Diehl (1993) Food of the Gods // The Archaic Revival. Body Mind Spirit Magazine Vol: 12 no. 1 Feb 28, ISSN: 0895-7657. [Review of Food of the gods and The archaic revival] pp. 66;

  • Erik Davis (1993) True hallucinations (review). Details no. 11 Apr, ISSN: 0740-4921. pp. 166-167;

  • Judy Corman (1993) Sobering words about drugs. New York Times May 9, p. 11, ISSN: 0362-4331. Chiding response—from a vice president of a nonprofit substance abuse services organization—to Tripping, but not falling (1993). “Surely the fact that Terence McKenna says that the psilocybin mushroom ‘is the megaphone used by an alien, intergalatic Other to communicate with mankind’ is enough for us to wonder if taking LSD had done something to his mental faculties”.

  • Vicki Cooper (1993) True hallucinations. UFO: A forum on extraordinary theories and phenomena Vol: 8 no. 4 ISSN: 1043-1233. [Review of True hallucinations] Editor: Vicki Cooper and U. F. O. Psychedelic; pp. 37-38;

  • Peter Conrad (1993) Arcadia: Last of the head trips. New York Times Book Review Jun 6, p. A1, ISSN: 0028-7806. [Review of True hallucinations] A negative review. “This [obsidian liquid] sounds to me like moonshine, and I suffered hallucinogenic agonies of my own while reading his shrilly ecstatic prose”.

  • Allan Combs (1993) Trialogues at the Edge of the West. World Futures Vol: 38 no. 4 Dec, ISSN: 0260-4027. [Review of Trialogues at the edge of the west] pp. 256-257; Positive review of Trialogues at the edge of the west: “We owe a debt of thanks to these three highly original individuals for allowing us to eavesdrop in this fertile and unedited (chaotic) stage of the creation of ideas”.

  • Anon (1993) The Hallucinogeneration Game. New Musical Express Feb 27, ISSN: 0028-6362. pp. More information: http://www.cuttlefish.com/universalshamen/articles/1993.html.

  • David Jay Brown (1993) True McKenna. High Times no. 218 Oct, “The new tribalism.” ISSN: 0310-2165. [Review of True hallucinations: Being an account of the author’s extraordinary adventures in the devil’s paradise (1993)] pp. 17; An enthusiastically positive review of True hallucinations by an author of the long High Times interview collected in Mavericks of the mind: Conversations for the new millennium (1993). Purchase: http://headshop.hightimes.com/cgi-bin/72D07F2D/mac/additmdtl.mac/showItemDetail?item=218.

  • Anon (1993) The Sacred Mushroom Seeker. Through the Looking Glass (Freakbeat Supplement) no. 8 Apr 19, [Review of The sacred mushroom seeker] pp. 25;

  • Anon (1993) Food of the Gods. Through the Looking Glass (Freakbeat Supplement) no. 8 Apr 19, [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 25;

  • Anon (1993) Answers blowin’ in the mind: The vision thing; A regular digest of ideas whose time has not yet come. Guardian Jan 11, p. ISSN: 0261-3007.

  • Anon (1993) Answers blowin’ in the mind: The vision thing; A regular digest of ideas whose time has not yet come. Guardian Jan 4, p. 8, ISSN: 0261-3007.

  • Anon (1993) Terence McKenna: New Age lecturer and author. Newsmakers: The people behind today’s headlines “1993 Cumulation.” ISSN: 0899-0417. Illustrator: photo: Kathleen Thormod Carr; pp. 307-309; Confusing biographical conflation of McKenna with the Canadian journalist and documentarian of the same name, also with a brother as collaborator. McKenna, the subject of this bibliography, gets about 95 percent of the coverage.

  • Gail Wood (1992) Parapsychology — The Archaic Revival by Terence McKenna. Library Journal Vol: 117 no. 7 Apr 15, ISSN: 0363-0277. [Review of The archaic revival] pp. 110; Positive review of The archaic revival. “The ideas presented in this collection of interviews, speeches, and articles are radical even now, and will challenge the reader”.

  • Barbara Valle (1992) History Ends in Green: Gaia, Psychedelics, and the Archaic Revival by Terence McKenna. Library Journal Vol: 117 no. 21 Dec, ISSN: 0363-0277. [Review of History ends in green] pp. 212;

  • Richard Thomas (1992) Feed Your Head. San Francisco Chronicle Aug 2, p. 10,

  • Peter Stafford, Jeremy Bigwood, Andrew Weil and Dan Joy (1992) Psychedelics Encyclopedia. 3rd expanded ed. Ronin Publishing, Oakland CA. 420 pages; ISBN: 0914171518. Stafford mentions “The Inner Landscape” [sic] on p. 337; not mentioned in 1st ed. (1978), but 2nd Revised edition (1983) also has a would-be The invisible landscape reference on p. 337. The first edition mentions Psilocybin LibraryThing.

  • Fred Smith (1992) Food of the Gods: a recipe for the mind. Psychedelic Illuminations no. 3 [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 52-53;

  • Kyle Silfer (1992) Nevermind the Overmind: Nirvana, Terence McKenna, Rodney King and White Guilt. Reign of Toads no. 2 pp.

  • John Shirley (1992) Zapped by the Great Pink Beam. Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 23 Spring, “Gnosticism Revisited.” ISSN: 0894-6159. [Review of In pursuit of Valis] pp. 70-71; Mixed review of In pursuit of Valis. “The dismaying attempts by Sutin and McKenna to vindicate the sadder side of Dick’s visions weaken the book for me”.

  • Donna Seaman (1992) Food of the Gods. Booklist Jan 1, ISSN: 0006-7385. [Review of Food of the gods] pp.

  • Tensho David Schneider (1992) Saving the Earth’s healing secrets: Traditional peoples have spent millennia learning the miraculous healing powers of tropical plants. As the rainforests go, so goes this irreplaceable indigenous wisdom. Yoga Journal no. 105 Aug 31, ISSN: 0191-0965. pp. 56-63;

  • Giorgio Samorini (1992) The oldest representations of hallucinogenic mushrooms in the world (Sahara desert, 9000-7000 b.p.). Integration: Zietschrift für Geistbewegende Pflanzen und Kultur no. 2&3 ISSN: 0939-4958. pp. 69-78; More information: http://www.samorini.net/doc/sam/sah_int.htm. Samorini, in the original print article, acknowledged that McKenna had separately proposed the Saharian ethnomycological hypothesis (p. 75). The web version of the article, however, omits this acknowledgement, while retaining the ReVision citation (Hallucinogenic mushrooms and evolution 1988) among the references.

  • Howard L. Rheingold (1992) Food of the Gods & Experiment at Petaluma. Whole Earth Review no. 74 Spring, ISSN: 0749-5056. [Review of Food of the gods and Experiment at Petaluma] pp. 60-61; Positive review of Food of the gods that takes the common position that McKenna’s theories are best understood as myths: “McKenna is a writer and encyclopedic interdisciplinary scholar, and a swashbuckling psychedelic ethnobotanist, but I believe he is primarily a bard.” Also includes one-sentence description of Experiment at Petaluma, and an excerpt from Food of the Gods.

  • Richard Restak (1992) Beyond the Doors of Perception. Washington Post Mar 22, p. X4, Final Edition. ISSN: 0190-8286.

  • Alex Raksin (1992) Food of the Gods. Los Angeles Times Feb 23, p. 6, Sunday, Home Edition. ISSN: 0458-3035. [Review of Food of the gods]

  • Paco Xander Nathan (1992) Timewave surfer dudes. bOING bOING: Brain Candy for Happy Mutants! no. 10 pp. 34; More information: http://www.deoxy.org/t_twzrev.htm.

  • Rowland Morgan (1992) Throwing Open The Doors Of Perception. Independent Oct 11, p. 32, Sunday Edition.

  • Don Kennison (1992) Terence McKenna: Shamanic Evolutionist for the Neopsychedelic Age. Reflex no. 26 Jul, ISSN: 1065-1195. pp. 41;

 

 

 

  • Penny Kaganoff (1992) The Archaic Revival. Publishers Weekly Vol: 239 no. 19 Apr 20, ISSN: 0000-0019. [Review of The archaic revival] Illustrator: Satty; pp. 48-49;

  • Ryan J. Huxtable (1992) The mushrooming brain. Nature no. 356 ISSN: 0028-0836. [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 635-636; Relentless dismissal of Food of the gods and the stoned ape theory, without being a wholly negative review. “If anything, Food of the Gods is poetry disguised in the language of science,” and, ““…perhaps the arguments in this book are no more meant to be taken literally than any other creation story”.

  • Eric Hinsdale (1992) Social Science — Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge by Terence McKenna. Library Journal Vol: 117 no. 3 Feb 15, ISSN: 0363-0277. [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 188; Generally negative review of Food of the gods. “The author’s disdain for the scientific approach and reliance on spiritualism obscures some worthwhile insights on the irrational intolerance of drugs in our society”.

  • Jordan Gruber (1992) Return of native wisdom. Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 24 Summer, “Saints & Scoundrels.” ISSN: 0894-6159. [Review of Food of the gods] pp. 61-62;

  • Richard Gehr (1992) Omega man: It’s the end of the world as we know it (and Terence McKenna feels fine). Village Voice Vol: 37 no. 18 May 5, ISSN: 0042-6180. pp. 47-48;

  • Richard Gehr (1992) Omega Man: A Profile of Terence McKenna. Posted: Apr 5, 1992. Visited: Apr 26, 2000. More information: http://www.levity.com/rubric/mckenna.html.

  • Lucy Fisher (1992) Paradise lost and found. Times Aug 15, p. ISSN: 0307-661X. [Review of Food of the gods]

  • Erik Davis (1992) Trialogues at the edge of the West. Voice Literary Supplement no. 110 Nov, ISSN: 0887-8633. [Review of Trialogues at the edge of the west] pp. 29;

  • David Ciaffardini (1992) True hallucinations. Sound Choice no. 17 ISSN: 8756-8176. [Review of True hallucinations] Illustrator: Michael Roden; pp. 48-49; An very enthusiastic review of the audiobook True hallucinations, followed by extensive excerpts. “[T]he narrative is masterful, with a gothic tone of scientific and spiritual mystery and revelation that is a match for the best adventure story-telling of Edgar Allen Poe”.

  • Anon (1992) Hot new age diversion: Shamanism. Rolling Stone no. 630 May 14, ISSN: 0035-791X. pp. 91;

  • Robert Anton Wilson (1991) Book Previews. Trajectories no. 10 Fall, [Review of In pursuit of Valis and Food of the gods] pp. 8-12; Positive reviews of In pursuit of Valis, The Eagle’s Quest and Food of the gods. Includes excerpts of all three. Wilson does not mention McKenna’s afterword to In pursuit of VALIS. Refering to Food of the Gods, Wilson says: “What McKenna has produced will shake all the social sciences like no book of our century”.

  • Kathleen Harrison McKenna (1991) review. Whole Earth Review no. 72 ISSN: 0749-5056. pp. 79;

  • Sam King (1991) Turn on, tune in, drop out and save the world. Independent Oct 14, p. 16, Monday Edition.

  • Dan Joy (1991) Psychedelics now: A report on the Bridge Conference. High Times no. 190 Jun, ISSN: 0310-2165. pp. 52-5,60-1; Three paragraphs on McKenna’s “antiwar” speech. “The propsychedelic position is an antidrug position,” because entheogenic “deconditioning agents” promote reflection and not the “unconscious, destructive behavior patterns” of other drugs.

  • Anon (1991) Food of the Gods. Kirkus Reviews Dec 15, ISSN: 0042-6598. [Review of Food of the gods] pp.

  • Robert Anton Wilson (1990) Gaia: the trajectories of Her evolution, Part IV. Trajectories no. 7 Spring, pp. 14-18; Article by Wilson mentions McKenna’s Timewave Theory on p 17; “I cannot imagine socio-evolutionary quantum jumps accelerating to the rate of 1,000,000 per second. Yet I most certainly believe that McKenna has a correct intuition somewhere in the middle that rather baroque theory. I totally agree with him that things can only get weirder and move faster from here on out…”.

  • Nick West (1990) The experiment at Petaluma. Magical Blend no. 27 Jul, ISSN: 1073-5879. [Review of Experiment at Petaluma] pp. 79-80; An enthusiastic review of Experiment at Petaluma, “an amazing visual and audio rendition of Terence McKenna’s lastest thinking on psychedelics, visual [sic] reality, and ‘visible language.’” West notes that this kind of media object is “baby’s first visible words” in the language McKenna anticipates.

  • Ted Schultz (1990) Tributes to a magical mycophile. Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 17 Fall, “Sex & Spirituality.” ISSN: 0894-6159. [Review of The sacred mushroom seeker] pp. 70,72;

  • Alistair Couper (1990) The holy data suit (letter to the editor). Whole Earth Review no. 67 Summer, ISSN: 0749-5056. pp. 136-137; Couper mulls over the contrast between Jaron Lanier’s Virtual Reality and McKenna’s Psychedelic Reality (Plan, plant, planet, 1989), eventually opting for the latter: “I rest assured that all the mutability and transformation I can handle lie no further than the nearest cowpie…”.

  • Richard Allen (1990) Gateway to inner space. Through the Looking Glass (Freakbeat Supplement) no. 7 Nov, [Review of Gateway to inner space] pp. 18;

  • Howard L. Rheingold (1989) Ethnobotany and the search for vanishing knowledge. Whole Earth Review no. 64 Fall, ISSN: 0749-5056. pp. 16-22;

  • Micky Remann (1989) Im Garten der Zauberpflanzen. Esotera: Neue Dimensionen des Bewußtseins Sep 9, ISSN: 0003-2921. (In German) pp. 22-28; In a survey of issues around plant-based hallucinogens which mentions Albert Hoffmann, Gordon Wasson and Christian Råtsch, among others, McKenna and wife Kathleen’s Botanical Dimensions plantation in Hawaii is described as a “Noah’s Ark for psychoactive plants”.

  • E. E. Rehmus (1989) UnMcKenna-like! (letter to the editor). Critique: A journal of conspiracies & metaphysics no. 32 Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan, ISSN: 0735-6501. pp. 4; Rehmus chides McKenna for his “un-McKennalike” view, expressed in Brown and McClen’s Terence K. McKenna: An interview (1989), that the “Eleusinian Mystery God” counseled procreation, and that one has no relevance for the future unless one does.

  • Mark Nicoll-Johnson (1989) The I, Claudius/magic mushroom connection. Whole Earth Review no. 65 Winter, ISSN: 0749-5056. pp. 138-139; Brundage commends the works of Robert Graves, including The white goddess, and Fraser’s The golden bough, to readers of McKenna, Rheingold and Wasson.

  • Stephen A. Hoeller (1988) Bohemia, not Bavaria. Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 9 Fall, “Northern Mysteries.” ISSN: 0894-6159. pp. 3; Letter to the editor of Gnosis. Refering to McKenna’s article reviewing A solution to the Voynich manuscript, Hoeller points out McKenna’s error of fact concerning the historical period of the manuscript’s appearance.

  • Mary A. Fischer (1988) Blast to the past: Terence McKenna’s traveling Archaic Revival floats into Ojai, on a psychedelic mushroom cloud. Los Angeles Magazine Vol: 33 no. 8 ISSN: 0024-6522. [Review of Man and woman at the end of history (1988)] Illustrator: Photo credit: Morgan Alexander; pp. 54-60; Sympathetic and engaging article describing a weekend seminar with McKenna and Riane Eisler (The chalice and the blade: our history, our future, 1987) at the Ojai Foundation, which was recorded for publication.

  • Michael J. Castronova (1988) Voynich mystery solved: Cross-cultural purification? Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 9 Fall, “Northern Mysteries.” ISSN: 0894-6159. pp. 3; Letter to the editor of Gnosis. Refering to McKenna’s article reviewing A solution to the Voynich manuscript, Castronova speculates the manuscript concerns a menstrual purification rite, rather than Levitov’s claim of group euthansia by venesection.

  • Bob Banner (1988) A summary report on the Angels, Aliens and Archetypes Conference. Critique: A journal of conspiracies & metaphysics no. 27 “Beyond left/right.” ISSN: 0735-6501. pp. 64-65,36; Brief notes on McKenna’s talk, Shamanic Approaches to the UFO, at the Angels, Aliens and Archetypes Conference (1987). According to Banner, McKenna argued against rushing to explain UFO contact phenomenon and for understanding the UFO as an archetypal rebuttal to the dominator culture/Science paradigm.

  • Elvin D. Smith (1985) Commentary on the works of Dennis and Terence McKenna. Psychozoic Press no. 10 Summer, pp. [24]-[39];

  • Ted Schultz (1985) Amazonian psychoactives. Gnosis: a journal of the Western inner traditions no. 1 Fall/Winter, “Gnosticism Ancient & Modern.” ISSN: 0894-6159. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 44;

  • Gracie and Zarkov (1985) “They say it helps if you close your eyes, cowboy”. High Frontiers no. 2 pp. 27; Review of the Esalen weekend seminar: Psychedelic perspectives on future history. The title is a quote from the weekend attributed to McKenna.

  • Richard Dobson (1985) True hallucinations (alien intelligence and psilocybin). Shaman’s Drum: a journal of experiential Shamanism no. 1 Summer, ISSN: 0887-8897. [Review of True hallucinations] pp. 38;

  • Robert Anton Wilson and John Thompson (1977) Cosmic Trigger: Final secret of the Illuminati. And/Or Press, Berkeley CA. 272 pages; ISBN: 0915904292. Wilson summarizes and discusses the “McKenna Theory” of the hologramatic universe and the accelerating pace of novelty (pp. 215-8) as described in The Invisible Landscape LibraryThing.

 

  • Anon (none) letters to the editor. High Frontiers no. 2 pp.


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